Monday, October 11, 2010

Japanese Keyboard Not Functioning Correctly After Installing Windows 7

This is a common problem for laptops bought in Japan. Japanese laptop = Japanese OS. If you want to convert it to English operating system, you will face a very common problem after converting.

Problem
: After upgrading/converting your OS (Windows Vista to Windows 7), your Japanese laptop keyboard is not functioning correctly (different layout). The most common affected keys are the @ sign which is located along with number 2 in standard keyboard, (, :, +,

Reason: Windows Vista and Windows 7 somehow identifies some Japanese keyboards as an English device.

Solution: You will need to go to the Registry and tell Windows that you have the standard 106/109 Japanese keyboard instead of the English 101 version.

Go to:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\i8042prt\Parameters
and change the following entries to this value:

LayerDriver JPNREG_SZkbd106.dll
OverrideKeyboardIdentifierREG_SZPCAT_106KEY
OverrideKeyboardSubtypeDWORD2
OverrideKeyboardTypeDWORD7

If you don't know how to do it, here's the step-by-step guide from Microsoft:
  1. Click Start
    Start button
    , type regedit in the Start Search box, and then click regedit in thePrograms list.

     User Account Control permission
    If you are prompted for an administrator password or for confirmation, type the password, or click Continue.
  2. Locate and then click the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\i8042prt\Parameters
  3. Right-click LayerDriver JPN, and then click Modify.

    Note If the LayerDriver JPN registry entry does not exist, create it. To do this, right-click a blank area in the details pane, point to New, and then click String Value. Then, typeLayerDriver JPN to name the new string value.
  4. In the Value data box, delete the existing value, type kbd106.dll, and then click OK.
  5. Right-click OverrideKeyboardIdentifier, and then click Modify.

    Note If the OverrideKeyboardIdentifier registry entry does not exist, create it. To do this, right-click a blank area in the details pane, point to New, and then click String Value. Then, type OverrideKeyboardIdentifier to name the new string value.
  6. In the Value data box, delete the existing value, type PCAT_106KEY, and then clickOK.
  7. Right-click OverrideKeyboardSubtype, and then click Modify.

    Note If the OverrideKeyboardSubtype registry entry does not exist, create it. To do this, right-click a blank area in the details pane, point to New, and then click DWORD (32-bit) Value. Then, type OverrideKeyboardSubtype to name the new DWORD value.
  8. In the Value data box, delete the existing value, type 2, and then click OK.
  9. Right-click OverrideKeyboardType, and then click Modify.

    Note If the OverrideKeyboardType registry entry does not exist, create it. To do this, right-click a blank area in the details pane, point to New, and then click DWORD (32-bit) Value. Then, type OverrideKeyboardType to name the new DWORD value.
  10. In the Value data box, delete the existing value, type 7, and then click OK.
  11. Exit Registry Editor. Then, restart the computer.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thank you for this easy to use guide! I used it to upgrade a Japanese Eeepc from xp to windows 7 while remaining fully functioning for both Japanese and English. very handy.

Edmar said...

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chinaski said...

My 2 cents. If you have a Windows Ultimate version you do not need to re-install an English version of Windows. You can install a language, from the Control Panel. You should not have any problem with your keyboard this way.

JD said...

this will not work to laptop with special layout (like special @ button beside p button). i am still searchin tho.

Anonymous said...

I have a Lenovo ThinkPad X220 with a Japanese keyboard (purchased in Japan). "@" key beside the "P" key, etc.

When I installed Windows 7 Ultimate (English), my keyboard mapped correctly (when choosing "Japanese Keyboard"). However, I recently installed Windows 7 Home Premium on the same system, and ran into the problem reported on this page.

I'm confirming that the fix documented here worked for me.

Thanks!

duc su said...

Thanks for the tip. I hope this will work for my scenario. I have installed a vista ultimate and I want to convert it to full Japanese os using Japanese keyboard.

Stephanie Gonzales said...

Thank you so much! Now I can play Japanese games ^_^!

Stephanie Gonzales said...
This comment has been removed by the author.